Call of Duty: Warzone loadouts Activision Blizzard

For the most part, players are enjoying the new battle royale, Call of Duty: Warzone. There are tons of new features and the gameplay can be extremely fast or fairly slow, giving players options on how they want to play. Of course, with a new game comes some complaints from the player base about some in-game mechanics or features. With Warzone, the top complaint has been the custom loadouts and how many sniper rifles this introduces to the game. Should Activision rework the loadouts and how players acquire them?

Warzone loadouts are causing issues

If you’re unaware, loadouts can be purchased at Buy Stations for $6,000. You can purchase any pre-made class that you put together through the in-game menu. While some players go for an assault rifle or shotgun, most purchase a sniper rifle loadout.

The AX-50 has been the predominant choice for most, but the HDR also sees a lot of action. Though there’s nothing wrong with this in theory, the fact of the matter is by the endgame, most players have a sniper rifle equipped.

To make matters worse, nearly every player throws a thermal sight on the sniper, allowing them to see players more easily. In most Warzone matches, the final zone comes down to several teams camping a building or piece of cover with a thermal sniper. Tyler “Ninja” Blevins explains why this is a problem.

The snipers are not the problem, however. The issue lies with the ability to purchase custom loadouts at Buy Stations for only $6,000. If you’re careful about looting, you can find that amount of money fairly quickly in Warzone.

So, this is where most players feel a change is most needed. Activision or Infinity Ward hasn’t commented on the matter, but Warzone is only six days old. Perhaps with more time and data, the developers will make a change to the price of custom loadouts or maybe remove them altogether.

Make sure to keep up with Daily Esports for all Call of Duty and Warzone news.

Joey Carr
Joey Carr is a full-time writer for multiple esports and gaming websites. He has 6+ years of experience covering esports and traditional sporting events, including DreamHack Atlanta, Call of Duty Championships 2017, and Super Bowl 53.