Dragon Ball FighterZ national Championship Roshi DLC

Yesterday, Bandai Namco and Arc System Works officially announced a Dragon Ball FighterZ National Championship. As expected, the championship will be completely online, but how the companies have set up the tournament certainly is not expected.

The tournament will split up contestants by regions: Japan, France, Spain, and the US. The US has been split into US East Coast and US West Coast, bringing the region tally to five regions. Only eight players from each region will be invited to the Dragon Ball FighterZ National Championship. Each region will host a seven-day round-robin bracket, allowing all contestants in the region to play one another. Players in the round-robin must win five matches per match-up to advance to the playoffs, ensuring some rather long and intense battles.

The playoffs will then last for a whole month, crowning one player as the National Champion.

Round-Robin will start in October

The round-robin for the Dragon Ball FighterZ National Championship will begin in October. The playoffs and finals will take place in December. Throughout the tournament, Bandai Namco will host Community Content roundups for all of the events.

Bandai Namco will reveal the invited players in September on the next Dragon Ball FighterZ show. The show will also reveal more details regarding the upcoming DLC fighter, Master Roshi. In addition, Bandai teased that more info will come soon regarding the next two unrevealed DLC characters.

Dragon Ball FighterZ National Championship

Screen capture from DBFZ show

By then we should also have a confirmed date in October for the round-robin portion to begin. It should be seven days of intense battles across the globe, and hopefully, the netcode problems that have plagued this game from the beginning won’t be too big of a factor.

Stay tuned to Daily Esports for all updates regarding Dragon Ball FighterZ National Championship and other DBFZ news!

Keri Honea
Keri has been a part of the video games industry as a writer and editor since 2004. Her video game backstory is long, convoluted, and better left unheard. When she’s not playing or writing about video games, she’s reading Warhammer 40k novels, teaching yoga, and making sure her kids don’t burn down the house.