PUBG India

PUBG Corporation has officially cut ties with Tencent Games, thereby removing its authorization to publish PUBG Mobile. With this decree, India’s ban on Chinese mobile apps will no longer include PUBG Mobile. Or, at least it should no longer include PUBG Mobile.

PUBG Corp. said in a statement on September 8 that it will take on all publishing responsibilities in India. PUBG just happened to be the biggest-grossing mobile game in India last month. India also just happens to be the game’s most lucrative market. Even just a few days off the Indian market was probably a blow to the company’s finances.

“PUBG Corporation fully understands and respects the measures taken by the government as the privacy and security of player data is a top priority for the company,” the company’s statement added. “It hopes to work hand-in-hand with the Indian government to find a solution that will allow gamers to once again drop into the battlegrounds while being fully compliant with Indian laws and regulations.”

Considering PUBG was downloaded more than 54 million times and generated $2.2 million in revenue just last month, it’s hardly a surprise PUBG Corporation took action so quickly. That said, however, the Indian government has not commented on whether they will unblock the PUBG mobile apps after the Corporation’s announcement, much less when the apps will be available again.

India’s ban against China continues

Last week, India’s Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology banned mobile apps from China. This was all under the claim of “national security.” The original tally was 118 apps, including two PUBG mobile apps. According to Gateway House in Mumbai, nearly 200 mobile apps have been banned with this order. These apps include WeChat, the Chinese search engine Baidu, and Alipay, a mobile payment app.

Be sure to stick with Daily Esports for all news and updates for PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds and PUBG Mobile.

Keri Honea
Keri has been a part of the video games industry as a writer and editor since 2004. Her video game backstory is long, convoluted, and better left unheard. When she’s not playing or writing about video games, she’s reading Warhammer 40k novels, teaching yoga, and making sure her kids don’t burn down the house.