Razer has taken their keyboard family to a whole different size. It’s small and perfect if you’re tight on space. We got our hands on the Huntsman Mini to test out. Here’s what we thought.

The small, compact gaming keyboard for travelers or the space-conscious gamer.

Compact size, perfect for traveling or the space conscious

The Huntsman Mini’s small size makes it idea for traveling. I’m one of those people who can’t live without a mouse, and it goes everywhere with me. I’ve always refrained from taking a keyboard with me, however, because they are simply too big. With the Huntsman Mini, that’s no longer an issue. As soon as travel opens back up again, this mini will be going straight in my luggage.

Check out the size comparison. We had (almost) the whole Huntsman family. Which one would you choose? Razer Huntsman (top), Razer Huntsman Tournament Edition (middle), Razer Huntsman Mini (bottom).

Mini Keyboard, multiple functions

The Huntsman Mini comes equipped with PBT keys. These feel really nice to use. They’re less clacky than the ABS keys on the other larger keyboards in the Huntsman family. This is really great if you’re having a lot of video calls or when traveling and you don’t want to annoy a whole bunch of people in a co-working space. However, you can get some bleeding of the light through the keys. Personally, I like this, because I love to have my RGB really vibrant.

Since the keyboard lacks numbers and arrows, you might be missing some of the functions. All your favorite keys are still accessible via secondary keys. If you like using media, home keys, and numbers, they’re all there, although it is a little tougher to access. But if you’re primarily using this for gaming, if you have a small desk, or taking it traveling, there’s really no need for all these extra keys. The Huntsman mini simply has what you need.

But seriously what is with that moon key? Yes, it’s to wake up the PC, but the key is in such a prominent spot, it looks like it should be turning off the colors of the keyboard or something. On the larger keyboards, the moon is in the top right corner. On the mini, it’s the complete opposite on the bottom left hand side. I had to do a “what is that key for again?”

No branding?

What I’m really missing here is some branding. I do love to show off my love of a brand and there’s no snake or Razer logo anywhere really visible. There’s a tiny one on the front of the keyboard but this isn’t really noticeable. In fact, I completely missed it the first time I unboxed it. I would have liked it in a bit more of a prominent position. The snake could have been added as one of the keys. Or the word logo could have come across the space bar. Then it’d light up! Some players will welcome the lack of branding, but I like to show it off. If you like branding, then there’s something else instead.

You’ll notice on my pretty keyboard I have my name across the space bar! This was something special Razer organized for us. Like the beautiful black box that mine came in, customers unfortunately don’t get access to this customization. Vjin however did hint in a previous interview with us that something like this could be coming. If personalization is something you’re interested in, you’ll need to keep an eye out for updates.

Don’t miss out

You can get the Huntsman mini in Razer’s classic black or Mercury white. Customers have the choice between purple or red switches. Cost is $119.99 US ($219.95 AU) for purple or $129.99 US ($239.95 AU) for red. This feels really high for something that’s 60% smaller in size. Gamers would probably disagree with me, though. Just days after it was released, the more expensive linear red switch editions were sold out. So if you’re keen, snap it up now before the rest of them run out the door. Grab your Huntsman Mini or check out all the juicy specs over on the Razer website.

Michelle Mannering
Michelle is a Content Producer in the realms of innovation and technology. Known as the “Hackathon Queen” 👑 you'll often find her on stage MC’ing or speaking on a range of topics from artificial intelligence, to business, community engagement, the future of work, and esports. With a background in both science and arts, Michelle writes extensively on a range of topics including innovation, startups, corporate culture, esports, business development, and more. She has a passion for gaming and combines this with her experience in a range of industries. Michelle brings a unique insight into esports innovation and draws many parallels between the physical world of sport, and the digital world of esports.