rocket league ui update psyonix developer
Image via Psyonix

Rocket League is currently undergoing one of the biggest changes in its history. Going to Free-To-Play (F2P) on the Epic Games Store on September 23, fans can’t wait for this next chapter in the game’s life cycle. However, some of the changes due to this update aren’t going over so well. Around a week ago, developer Psyonix released a fairly substantial update to get ready for the F2P release. While this patch included some solid additions, the alteration of the User Interface (UI) wasn’t one of them. Fans have complained so much about the new design that a Psyonix developer chimed in.

Psyonix dev talks about UI changes in Rocket League

If you haven’t loaded up Rocket League in the past week or so, then you might not be aware of these changes. Essentially, Psyonix completely altered how the game’s menus look and operate. For example, at the main menu, there’s no longer a “Training” tab. Instead, it’s lumped in with the other playlists in Rocket League under the “Play” tab.

rocket league update psyonix

Image via Psyonix

Many fans in the community have called these UI changes unnecessary, as the previous design was perfectly adequate. However, Psyonix has defended its decision, citing that the new influx of players from the F2P launch will find the new design easier to navigate.

One developer, Corey Davis, even went on Reddit to explain the changes to fans. Here’s what he had to say:

“Our objective for a Free to Play release was to address areas of the game that could be clearer or more intuitive for new players. For the seasoned veterans that populate this subreddit, that can sometimes look like changing things that weren’t broken.”

Davis clearly sees why Rocket League veterans are upset. However, it doesn’t appear the studio will be reverting any of these changes in the near future. So veterans of the game will simply have to adjust to the new UI design.

Make sure to stay tuned to Daily Esports for all Rocket League news.

Joey Carr
Joey Carr is a full-time writer for multiple esports and gaming websites. He has 6+ years of experience covering esports and traditional sporting events, including DreamHack Atlanta, Call of Duty Championships 2017, and Super Bowl 53.