call of duty black ops cold war sliding with ninja
Image via Activision

Call of Duty: Black Ops Cold War has been out now for just about two weeks. The player base is beginning to find a groove with the game’s mechanics and nuisances as more playtime is logged. Movement is becoming more fluid, and players are mastering guns and exploring every facet of multiplayer. However, even with all of this discovery and understanding, there’s still one mistake most players are making. While not a game-breaking fault by any means, fixing this blunder could result in players staying alive for longer.

What’s the number one mistake players make in Black Ops Cold War?

While there are certainly a number of oversights by players, the number one mistake is sliding too much. This movement mechanic was severely overpowered in the open beta and since then, players have been sliding all around the maps.

However, this is not the correct way to effectively move, and it results in players being killed more often than not. First off, simply sprinting is a far faster and more efficient way to move. Secondly, sliding makes it so enemies can hear you from meters away, allowing them to know exactly where you are.

black ops cold war sliding

Sliding is a popular mechanic but it’s overused a little too much in Black Ops Cold War. Image via Treyarch.

There’s a misconception in the community that the Ninja perk makes you near-silent, even when sliding. However, this isn’t true, as you can be heard clearly if you decide to slide near an enemy. You will make a pretty loud sound and this will alarm an enemy player, causing them to pre-aim wherever you’re coming from.

If you want to avoid this, simply stop sliding in places that don’t require it. Of course, sliding when you first spawn in or to surprise an enemy is perfectly fine and actually encouraged. However, sliding just to slide is an easy way to die when you don’t want to in Black Ops Cold War.

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Joey Carr
Joey Carr is a full-time writer for multiple esports and gaming websites. He has 6+ years of experience covering esports and traditional sporting events, including DreamHack Atlanta, Call of Duty Championships 2017, and Super Bowl 53.